• A Legend in it's Own Time

      Though Arthur's has only occupied its current location since 2001, the restaurant proudly bills itself as "A Dallas legend since 1948." That's when founder Arthur Bates opened his fine-dining establishment on McKinney Avenue. In the ensuing 55 years, the restaurant has weathered a couple of moves and a few ownership changes. (Mohsen Heidari, brother of Old Warsaw owner Al Heidari, has owned it since 1988.) The current incarnation retains its Continental style.

    LET THERE BE LIGHT:
    The setting is rich and sophisticated with a few exceptions. Rich, dark woods and a gargantuan crystal chandelier strike an ornate tone not carried through in the large wall of aquariums that separates the main dining room from the bar and dance floor.

    Nightly live music makes the bar area a draw, but the tunes - a medley of everything from Cher to Elton John to Santana covers on our visit didn't match the gracious mood in the dining room. Nor did our logo-adorned wineglass, a needlessly tacky touch.

    And while the dimly lit room may be suitably romantic, it also makes for uncomfortable menu reading. We would have appreciated an extra watt or two.



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  • Arthur's...

    CORRECTION: Arthur's was opened in 1948 by Arthur Bates. Mohsen Heidari purchased the restaurant in 1988 and is the fourth owner.

    One of the hardest working men in the restaurant business is finally back on his feet. Mohsen Heidari introduced Arthur's to Dallas more than 50 years ago and the restaurant became the place to wine, dine and dance. Two years ago, he closed the Doubletree location and settled into Addison. Four days after opening, lightning struck a transformer and the building burned to the ground. Heidari has now reopened Arthur's with the same dedication to sophistication and service that has become his trademark. The result? An elegant white-tableclothed dining room dimly lit by a spectacular crystal chandelier. A wall of tropical fish tanks separates diners from the intimate lounge where retro tunes like "Feelings" twinkle from the piano. A lobster starter served with the cold, sweet meat riding piggyback on the pink shell is accompanied by a delicious mustard aioli. A strip steak studded with peppercorns was cooked to perfection. Rainbow trout filled with lump crab would have delighted us more if it hadn't been wrapped with a thick strip of apple-smoked bacon. Service continues to be stellar. After dinner, we settled back with a chocolate souffle and tapped our toes to the music of the night. Thankfully, something old is new again.

  • Arthur's Prime Steaks...

    This restaurant's reputation as a prime steak place is deserved, but too limiting. The kitchen's ways with seafood, veal, fowl and even pasta are winners, too, and who can fault an appetizer list that includes shrimp cocktail, escargot and steak tartare proudly prepared with old-world pomp at tableside? Fresh sea scallops sauteed and sauced with a kiss of Dijon mustard and a whisper of lemon and capers struck an exquisite balance. Rack of lamb's rosy chops were fork tender and appropriately sided with a tomato rose and vegetables cared in the presentation-conscious French fashion. Seduced by ceremony, we decided to forgo dessert souffles to share bananas Foster, not on the menu, but lovingly prepared, flamed and served by our waiter as we watched. Cherries jubilee are another unlisted indulgence; we'll save those for the restaurant's upcoming 50th anniversary. And for the 60th? Who knows? Vive les classiques!

  • Arthur's Steaks a Claim to Another 48 Years...

    For Arthur's owner Mohsen Heidari, it must have been like receiving that initial invitation from the American Association of Retired Persons.

    "May I be the first to congratulate you on reaching your 50th Business Anniversary in 1996," began the letter from the Stephen Fossler Co. of Crystal Lake, Ill. "It's an accomplishment you should be very proud of."

    Had his steakhouse passed the half-century milestone without his knowing it? Mr. Heidari, the fourth owner of Arthur's, started doing some research. Someone recalled that the restaurant used to celebrate its anniversary in June. This was learned in July; it appeared that the 50th birthday would have to be after the fact.

    Happily, it turns out that the Stephen Fossler folks, who make personalized foil "anniversary seals," were as premature in launching their sales pitch as the AARP is. (Believe me, you'll get your first card from the retirees' organization long before you expect it.) Arthur's won't be 50 until 1998, so Mr. Heidari has a couple of years to plan its golden-anniversary bash. It should be a good one, but don't wait until then to visit.

    An ordinary night at Arthur's can be extraordinary.Since buying the steakhouse eight years ago, Mr. Heidari has given it a glamorous face lift. The old Arthur's was a dark, carpeted, masculine place...

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  • 5 Decades,4 Owners,3 Locations...

    Fifty-year-old restaurants are about as rare in Dallas as winning lottery tickets.Ones that come to mind included Brownies which had its golden anniversary a couple of years ago; the S&S, now in its seventh decade; El Fenix, in its eighth and a chain; and the Blue Front, which was well into its second century when it closed a couple of years ago.Those pushing 50 include Campisi's and Old Warsaw, both started in 1950, and the Mecca, born in 1948.Arthur's has just 23 months to go.

    It opened July 3, 1948, at 3701 McKinney Avenue, in a Charles Dilbeck-designed building that now houses Raphael's Mexican restaurant.

    An ad that appeared in that day's Dallas Morning News said the restaurant was "under the personal supervision of Arthur Bates."

    The paid announcement also described Arthur's as "a beautiful restaurant, conceived with exacting care . . . dedicated to people who appreciate fine food graciously served in an atmosphere of luxury and beauty." Since it opened, Arthur's has changed owners three times. It also has moved, to a freestanding building in the glittery Campbell Center on North Central Expressway.There are few witnesses to the restaurant's early days left. Arthur Bates died in 1975; his wife, Hetty, died in 1992. But old city directories and other records tell part of the story; acquaintances and Mrs. Bates nephew, Glen Denton, fill in some of the gaps.Mr. Bates, a native of Kentucky, came to Dallas in the mid-30's. He found work as food controller for the Baker Hotel, where he also lived...

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© Copright 2010 Arthur's Prime Steaks and Seafood. 15175 Quorum Drive, Addison, TX 75001

Dallas Steak House & Seafood Restaurant Reviews | Arthur's Prime Setak & Seafood | Addison, TX

Reviews for Arthur's Prime Steak & Seafood restaurant. Dallas steak house and seafood restaurant reviews. 15175 Quorum Drive, Addison. Steak house, Dallas private dining, happy hour specials.